Leap Motion

After it coming to my attention that I’m supposed to also discuss ‘current and potential issues within a digital media design context’ as well as my own work and development, I decided I should probably get on that (not that I don’t want to do that anyway, obviously). I thought long and hard about what ‘issues’ there are and still I’m not too sure what that even means but i’ll write about the closest possible thing I can think of.

Some of you may be aware of the Leap Motion, an input device similar to a mouse or keyboard but allows you to work/operate your computer in a 3D space in the air, cool right? Not so much… I’ve had one since it was released as I couldn’t resist the allure of waving my arms about like a mad man  to do things on my laptop. Sadly the potential of the cool little device hasn’t really been fully realised with a lack of good apps and not many people developing for it. 

But is this really an issue? I suppose it is for me and thousands of other people who bought it and now have it sitting in a drawer collecting dust, but it could be seen as a ‘topic for debate or discussion’ as issue is defined in the dictionary. A couple of months ago, September to be more specific HP unveiled the first ever laptop to have a Leap Motion controller embedded into it, they are even embedding them into some of their keyboards for the desktop market. This got me thinking about why they would even do such a thing… The device gained rather poor reviews at release and the general consensus was that it wasn’t as good as the promotional videos made it out to be (no surprise there, huh?). Maybe this is where the Leap Motion, and 3D-waving-hands-in-the-air-control really come into spotlight for 2014. Just like we saw a lot more things designed to be used for touch screen like the marvellous Windows 8, perhaps we’ll see an OS or at least a mask to put over an existing one to make it more user friendly. 

On a side note, it’d be cool to see the Leap Motion used in interactive art exhibitions or science museums to give a more ‘hands on’ experience which makes it far more interesting. There are already a few educational Leap apps such as Molecules which allows users to zoom in to, rotate and play with models of molecules. I’m not sure why people would want to do that but I guess thats something the kind of people who go to science museums would be interested in. 

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